What is YML?

by Rohit Khare and Adam Rifkin


As we promote the use of markup languages for representing the entire range of digital data, reusing a common format requires adaptable access patterns on the wire. Different network users may emphasize early access to parts of the structure, or only require access to parts of the structure, or perhaps just the structure and not the contents. Time affects the representation of markup instances in three ways: bandwidth, latency, and throughput. We can envision optimizing access along each of these axes by compression, reordering, and tokenization, respectively. YML is a hypothetical "wire protocol" that optimizes access to parsed markup instances in the hope of forestalling fragmentation into "compiled" archival formats.

We have been discussing YML since early 1998 on the FoRK mailing list, but we haven't really written any papers about it yet. It (as well as the concept of XML FORMs) is just a thought exercise for now, but if you'd like to know what we know, check out the following FoRKposts:

  1. Re: The Web needs to break its habit FoRMing by Rohit Khare
  2. Data, the Reverse Salient of Software by Adam Rifkin
  3. Re: Data, the Reverse Salient of Software by Doug Lea
  4. Re: Data, the Reverse Salient of Software by Dave Crook
  5. Separating Heads and Tails, or Code and Data by Rohit Khare
  6. What is Occam's Razor wrt Compression? by Adam Rifkin
  7. YML - Why Markup Language... by Rohit Khare and Adam Rifkin
  8. Re: Does anyone besides me think that XML has no clothes? by Rohit Khare and Adam Rifkin
  9. Re: YML - Why Markup Language... by Dean Swift
  10. Re: YML - Why Markup Language... by David Long
  11. Re: YML - Why Markup Language... by Lloyd Wood
  12. Re: YML - Why Markup Language... by David Long
  13. YML Requirements: Requirements for Interactive Access to HTML and XML Documents, by Rohit Khare as a position paper for the Future of HTML Workshop
  14. VML, PGML, and XML Marketing by Rohit Khare

Related Documents

  1. FoRK
  2. Munchkins
  3. Global Event Model
  4. An Events Bibliography
  5. Trust
  6. XML and other Relevant Web technologies



Adam Rifkin, http://www.ifindkarma.com/attic/

PhD-Related Documents, Caltech Infospheres Project

Last modified: Tue Jun 16 18:59:27 PDT 1998